ENERGYSOLUTIONS REQUESTS EXEMPTION FROM MASS AND CONCENTRATION LIMITATIONS

On August 30, 2018, the Utah Waste Management and Radiation Control Board held an emergency meeting beginning at 10:00 a.m. MT in Salt Lake City, Utah.  The purpose of the meeting was to review a request from EnergySolutions for an exemption from R313-25-9(5) of the Utah Administrative Code regarding mass and concentration limits.

The materials for the emergency Board meeting, including the EnergySolutions’ letter, which contains detailed background information and an explanation of the basis for the requested exemption, can be viewed online at https://www.utah.gov/pmn/files/423003.pdf#page=2.

Overview

By letter dated August 24, 2018,

On August 30, 2018, the Utah Waste Management and Radiation Control Board held an emergency meeting beginning at 10:00 a.m. MT in Salt Lake City, Utah.  The purpose of the meeting was to review a request from EnergySolutions for an exemption from R313-25-9(5) of the Utah Administrative Code regarding mass and concentration limits.

The materials for the emergency Board meeting, including the EnergySolutions’ letter, which contains detailed background information and an explanation of the basis for the requested exemption, can be viewed online at https://www.utah.gov/pmn/files/423003.pdf#page=2.

Overview

By letter dated August 24, 2018, EnergySolutions petitioned the Board for an exemption from the mass and concentration limitations of UAC R313-25-9(5)(a) and (c) in connection with the disposal of Class A depleted uranium solid metal penetrators (DU Penetrators).

UAC R313-12-55(1) allows the Board to “grant exemptions or exceptions from the requirements of the rules as it determines are authorized by law and will not result in undue hazard to public health and safety or the environment,” according to the EnergySolutions’ letter.  “Solid metal depleted uranium penetrators are less hazardous and less plentiful than the depleted uranium oxides which are the basis of the UAC R313-25-9(5) restriction and an exemption is warranted in accordance with the justification herein provided,” states EnergySolutions in its letter. 

 “The U.S. Army Joint Munitions Command (JMC), working under the direction of the Product Director for Demilitarization, is responsible for the safe and compliant disposition of munitions waste,” states EnergySolutions’ letter.  “The JMC seeks to transport and dispose of 30 mm munitions containing solid depleted uranium metal.  The DU Penetrators will be disassembled to remove the depleted uranium metal prior to packaging for transport and disposal.  The JMC plans to disassemble between 3.5 to 7 million penetrators each year, currently in storage at the Tooele Army Depot (Tooele, Utah) and Crane Army Ammunition Activity (Crane, Indiana).  The JMC expects to transport and dispose of approximately 667 yd3 of DU Penetrator Class A waste per year for up to 4 years (a projected DU Penetrator disposal volume of 2,668 yd3).  Disposal of this volume of class A depleted uranium metal will exceed the limitations promulgated in UAC R313-25-9(a).”

Background

The Board — which is appointed by the Utah Governor with the consent of the Utah Senate — guides development of Radiation Control policy and rules in the state.  The Board holds open meetings ten times per year at locations throughout the state.  A public comment session is held at the end of each meeting.

Copies of the Utah Waste Management and Radiation Control Board meeting agendas and packet information can be found at http://www.deq.utah.gov/boards/waste/meetings.htm.  

For additional information, please contact Rusty Lundberg, Deputy Director of the Division of Waste Management and Radiation Control at the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, at (801) 536-4257 or at (rlundberg (at) utah (dot) gov) rlundberg (at) utah (dot) gov.

petitioned the Board for an exemption from the mass and concentration limitations of UAC R313-25-9(5)(a) and (c) in connection with the disposal of Class A depleted uranium solid metal penetrators (DU Penetrators).

UAC R313-12-55(1) allows the Board to “grant exemptions or exceptions from the requirements of the rules as it determines are authorized by law and will not result in undue hazard to public health and safety or the environment,” according to the EnergySolutions’ letter.  “Solid metal depleted uranium penetrators are less hazardous and less plentiful than the depleted uranium oxides which are the basis of the UAC R313-25-9(5) restriction and an exemption is warranted in accordance with the justification herein provided,” states EnergySolutions in its letter. 

 “The U.S. Army Joint Munitions Command (JMC), working under the direction of the Product Director for Demilitarization, is responsible for the safe and compliant disposition of munitions waste,” states EnergySolutions’ letter.  “The JMC seeks to transport and dispose of 30 mm munitions containing solid depleted uranium metal.  The DU Penetrators will be disassembled to remove the depleted uranium metal prior to packaging for transport and disposal.  The JMC plans to disassemble between 3.5 to 7 million penetrators each year, currently in storage at the Tooele Army Depot (Tooele, Utah) and Crane Army Ammunition Activity (Crane, Indiana).  The JMC expects to transport and dispose of approximately 667 yd3 of DU Penetrator Class A waste per year for up to 4 years (a projected DU Penetrator disposal volume of 2,668 yd3).  Disposal of this volume of class A depleted uranium metal will exceed the limitations promulgated in UAC R313-25-9(a).”

Background

The Board — which is appointed by the Utah Governor with the consent of the Utah Senate — guides development of Radiation Control policy and rules in the state.  The Board holds open meetings ten times per year at locations throughout the state.  A public comment session is held at the end of each meeting.

Copies of the Utah Waste Management and Radiation Control Board meeting agendas and packet information can be found at http://www.deq.utah.gov/boards/waste/meetings.htm.  

For additional information, please contact Rusty Lundberg, Deputy Director of the Division of Waste Management and Radiation Control at the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, at (801) 536-4257 or at (rlundberg (at) utah (dot) gov) rlundberg (at) utah (dot) gov.

VERMONT YANKEE’S USED FUEL PLACED IN DRY STORAGE

On August 2, 2018, Holtec International announced the successful completion of the largest defueling project of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) in the United States.  According to Holtec, the project was completed in record time.

Entergy Nuclear signed a contract with Holtec to expeditiously defuel the Vermont Yankee spent fuel pool.  The overall project scope included construction of a second ISFSI pad, security expansion, engineering, licensing, manufacturing, delivering and loading of 45 HI-STORM cask systems, all on a turnkey basis.

For additional information, please contact Erika Grandrimo at (856) 797-0900, ext. 3920 or at (e.grandrimo (at) holtec (dot) com) e.grandrimo (at) holtec (dot) com.

GOVERNOR APPOINTS SALSMAN AND EDWARDS TO TEXAS COMPACT COMMISSION

On August 24, 2018, it was announced that Texas Governor Greg Abbott has reappointed John Salsman and appointed Lisa Edwards to the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact Commission for terms to expire on September 1, 2023.  The Texas Compact Commission manages the disposition of low-level radioactive waste, while maintaining the health, safety and welfare of citizens.

Appointments

John Salsman is the Director of the Environmental Health and Safety Department at the University of Texas at Austin.  He is a member of the Health Physics Society (HPS) and the American Academy of Health Physics.  Salsman received a Bachelor of Science in radiation protection engineering and a Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering from Texas A&M University.  He lives in of Driftwood, Texas.

Lisa Edwards is a Senior Program Manager of Chemistry, Radiation Safety, and High-Level Radioactive Waste at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).  Edwards received a Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry from Cornell College.  She lives in Granbury, Texas.

Background

The Texas Compact Commission meets several times per year in both Texas and Vermont.  The Texas Compact Commission may meet in closed session as authorized by the Texas Open Meetings Act, Chapter 551, Texas Government Code.  Texas Compact Commission meetings are open to the public.

The Texas Compact Commission is next scheduled to meet in Manchester, Vermont on October 11, 2018.

For additional information, please contact Texas Compact Commission Executive Director Leigh Ing at (512) 305-8941 or at (leigh.ing (at) tllrwdcc (dot) org) leigh.ing (at) tllrwdcc (dot) org

NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT CONTINUES NNSA PROGRAM RE VOLUNTARY PHASING OUT OF CESIUM CHLORIDE BLOOD IRRADIATION DEVICES

On August 13, 2018, President Donald J. Trump signed the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law No. 115-232).  Amongst other things, the law directs the Administrator for Nuclear Security to continue working toward the voluntary phasing out of the use of blood irradiation devices in the United States that rely on cesium chloride by December 31, 2027. 

The law authorizes the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to continue its current program to pay up to 50% of the per-device replacement costs and 100% of the disposition costs.  The law includes specified reporting requirements about the program to Congress.

The relevant text is as follows:

SEC. 3141. ACCELERATION OF REPLACEMENT OF CESIUM BLOOD IRRADIATION SOURCES. 

(a)  Goal.—The Administrator for Nuclear Security shall ensure that the goal of the covered programs is eliminating the use of blood irradiation devices in the United States that rely on cesium chloride by December 31, 2027.

(b)  Implementation.—To meet the goal specified by subsection (a), the Administrator shall carry out the covered programs in a manner that—

(1) is voluntary for owners of blood irradiation devices;

(2) allows for the United States, subject to the review of the Administrator, to pay up to 50 percent of the per-device cost of replacing blood irradiation devices covered by the programs;

(3) allows for the United States to pay up to 100 percent of the cost of removing and disposing of cesium sources retired from service by the programs; and

(4) replaces such devices with x-ray irradiation devices or other devices approved by the Food and Drug Administration that provide significant threat reduction as compared to cesium chloride irradiators.

(c)  Duration.—The Administrator shall carry out the covered programs until December 31, 2027.

(d)  Report.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Administrator shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report on the covered programs, including—

(1) identification of each cesium chloride blood irradiation device in the United States, including the number, general location, and user type;

(2) a plan for achieving the goal established by subsection (a);

(3) a methodology for prioritizing replacement of such devices that takes into account irradiator age and prior material security initiatives;

(4) in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Food and Drug Administration, a strategy identifying any legislative, regulatory, or other measures necessary to constrain the introduction of new cesium chloride blood irradiation devices;

(5) identification of the annual funds required to meet the goal established by subsection (a); and

(6) a description of the disposal path for cesium chloride sources under the covered programs.

(e)  Assessment.—The Administrator shall submit an assessment to the appropriate congressional committees by September 20, 2023, of the results of the actions on the covered programs under this section, including—

(1) the number of replacement irradiators under the covered programs;

(2) the life-cycle costs of the programs, including personnel training, maintenance, and replacement costs for new irradiation devices;

(3) the cost-effectiveness of the covered programs;

(4) an analysis of the effectiveness of the new irradiation devices’ technology; and

(5) a forecast of whether the Administrator will meet the goal established in subsection (a).

(f)  Definitions.—In this section:

(1)  APPROPRIATE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES.—The term “appropriate congressional committees” means—

(A) the Committee on Appropriations, the Committee on Armed Services, and the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives; and

(B) the Committee on Appropriations, the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, and the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate.

(2) COVERED PROGRAMS.—The term “covered programs” means the following programs of the Office of Radiological Security of the National Nuclear Security Administration:

(A) The Cesium Irradiator Replacement Program.

(B) The Off-Site Source Recovery Program.

For additional information, please see the following link to the bill: https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/5515/text#toc-HE367D447CEDB4375A344CBBF76D48202

 

 

PRESIDENT TRUMP TO NOMINATE WILLIAM BOOKLESS AS NNSA PRINCIPAL DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR

On August 10, 2018, President Donald J. Trump announced his intent to nominate William Bookless, a former Senior Physicist at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), to be the Principal Deputy Administrator at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

Bookless participated in various nuclear security research projects during his 32-year tenure at LLNL.  He worked as the Deputy Associate Director for the laboratory’s Nuclear Weapons Program, as well as the Associate Director for Safety and Environmental Protection.  His LLNL career culminated with a two and a half year assignment as Senior Adviser to the NNSA Administrator from 2009 to 2012.  Before retiring in 2015, Bookless served for three years as the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Planning at the Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Bookless received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Wyoming in 1980.  He received NNSA recognition for his advisory work on the 2010 Nuclear Posture Review and the New START Treaty.

For additional information, please see www.whitehouse.gov.

PROTO-PROMPT DECOMMISSIONING PLANNED FOR PILGRIM AND PALISADES SITES

On August 1, 2018, an agreement was announced for Entergy Corporation to sell the subsidiaries that own the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station in Plymouth, Massachusetts and the Palisades Power Plant in Covert, Michigan after their shutdowns and reactor defuelings to a Holtec International subsidiary for accelerated decommissioning.

The sales include the transfer of the licenses, spent fuel, and Nuclear Decommissioning Trusts (NDTs), as well as the site of the decommissioned Big Rock Point Nuclear Power Plant near Charlevoix, Michigan where only the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) remains.  The transactions are subject to conditions to closing, including approvals from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) of the license transfers.

Overview

Assuming timely regulatory approvals, Holtec expects to initiate proto-prompt decommissioning of Pilgrim in 2020, with the expectation that all major decommissioning work will be completed in approximately eight years.  A timeline for the decommissioning of Palisades will be developed closer to its shutdown. For both Pilgrim and Palisades, Holtec expects to move all of the spent nuclear fuel out of their spent fuel pools and into dry cask storage within approximately three years after the plants’ respective shutdowns.

In previous announcements, Entergy has stated that it remains committed to the safe and reliable operation of Pilgrim and Palisades until their permanent shutdowns.  By selling these plants for decommissioning, Entergy continues to execute its strategy to exit Entergy Wholesale Commodities and move to a pure play utility.  Entergy is seeking regulatory approvals to sell its subsidiary that owns the shutdown Vermont Yankee site by the end of 2018.

Next Steps

Holtec and Entergy expect to file a license transfer request with the NRC in the fourth quarter of this year for Pilgrim, with transaction closing targeted by the end of 2019.  For Palisades, the license transfer request would take place closer to its planned shutdown in the spring of 2022, with transaction closing expected by the end of that year.

Holtec will utilize Comprehensive Decommissioning International, LLC (CDI), which is a newly-formed U.S.-based joint venture company between Holtec International and SNC-Lavalin to perform the decommissioning, including all required demolition and cleanup.

“Holtec will draw on its own and its partners’ safety commitment and decades of experience and expertise in decommissioning and site remediation to carry out decommissioning, which could benefit the local communities by returning these plant sites (excluding each site’s used fuel storage facility) to productive use at an early date,” states the press release.  “Holtec will transfer all of the used nuclear fuel to its cask systems to be stored at the respective sites which will remain under guard at the sites, monitored during shutdown and decommissioning and subject to the NRC’s oversight, until the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) removes it in accordance with its legal obligations.”

Background

The Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station is the only nuclear power plant operating in Massachusetts.  It is located in the Manomet section of Plymouth on Cape Cod Bay, south of the tip of Rocky Point and north of Priscilla Beach.  Like many similar plants, it was constructed by Bechtel, and is powered by a General Electric BWR 3 boiling water reactor inside of a Mark 1 pressure suppression type containment and generator.  It has a 690 MW production capacity.  Pilgrim Station produces about 14% of the electricity generated in Massachusetts.  On October 13, 2015, plant owners announced that it would close by June 1, 2019.  Entergy cited “market conditions and increased costs,” which would have included tens of millions of dollars of necessary safety upgrades, as the basis for the decision to close the Pilgrim Station.

The Palisades Nuclear Generating Station is located on Lake Michigan in Van Buren County’s Covert Township, Michigan.  The plant is located on a 432-acre site that is five miles south of South Haven, Michigan. The Westinghouse Electric Company turbine generator can produce 725,000 kilowatts of electricity.  Built between 1967 and 1970, Palisades was approved to operate at full power in 1973.  The plant’s original licensee was due to expire on March 24, 2011.  An application for 20-year extension was filed in 2005 with the NRC.  It was granted on January 18, 2007. Therefore, the plant was then scheduled for decommissioning by 2031.  However, Entergy had made a decision to close the plant in October 2018.  Consumers Energy then attempted to buy its way out of a power purchase agreement it has with Entergy and the plant. The Michigan Public Service Commission (MPSC) did not approve Consumer Energy’s full request of $172 million, however, so Entergy decided to keep the plant open three years longer than planned.  Entergy currently plans to close the Palisades plant in 2022.  

For additional information about Holtec International, please see www.holtecinternational.com.  For additional information about CDI, please see www.cdi-decom.com

For additional information about the Pilgrim and Plymouth projects, please contact Erika Grandrimo at (856) 797-0900, ext. 3920 or at (e.grandrimo (at) holtec (dot) com) e.grandrimo (at) holtec (dot) com.

REGISTRATION OPEN FOR 2019 WASTE MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE

Registration is now open for the 2019 Waste Management (WM) conference, which will be held at the Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona from March 3-7, 2019.

Overview

The 2019 WM conference theme is “Encouraging Young Men & Women to Achieve Their Goals in Radwaste Management.”  The conference focus is promoting the next generation of radwaste management professionals, so young professionals are strongly encouraged to get involved.  The 2019 WM conference plans to have several special programs to encourage and support their participation.

The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) typically organizes a panel for the WM conference titled, Hot Topics and Emerging Issues in U.S. Commercial Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management.  The LLW Forum-organized panel focuses on emerging issues in U.S. commercial low-level radioactive waste management from the perspective of active members of the LLW Forum.  During the panel, state, compact, federal and industry officials share their views on a variety of timely and significant topics related to low-level radioactive waste management, disposal and related issues.

Background


The annual WM conference, presented by WM Symposia (WMS), is an international symposium concerning the safe and secure management of radioactive wastes arising from nuclear operations, facility decommissioning and environmental remediation, as well as storage, transportation and disposal and associated activates.  WMS was founded to provide a forum for discussing and seeking cost-effective and environmentally responsible solutions for the safe management and disposition of radioactive waste and radioactive materials.

The WM 2019 conference marks the 45th annual Waste Management Symposium.  The conference provides an opportunity for stakeholders to connect with the worldwide nuclear community in a forum for discussing and seeking safe and cost-effective solutions to managing and dispositioning radioactive waste and decommissioning nuclear facilities.  The WM 2019 conference will feature more than 500 papers and over 40 panel discussions in 130 plus technical sessions complemented by the industry’s largest annual exhibition of nearly 200 companies.  Registration will open in late August 2018.

For additional information on the Waste Management Conference, please call (480) 557-0263 or email to  (shelley (at) wmarizona (dot) org) shelley (at) wmarizona (dot) org or visit the organization’s website at www.wmsym.org.  For technical program questions, please contact WM Deputy Managing Director and Program Advisory Committee (PAC) Chair Gary Benda at (803) 317-1116 or at (gbenda (at) wmarizona (dot) org) gbenda (at) wmarizona (dot) org

HIGH PROFILE LETTER SENT TO DOE SECRETARY RICK PERRY RE NATIONAL SECURITY ATTRIBUTES OF U.S. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

By letter dated June 26, 2018, a broad coalition of 75 former government officials, lawmakers and industry leaders — a quarter of whom are retired admirals or vice admirals — expressed concern to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or Department) Secretary Rick Perry regarding the impact of the premature shutdown of nuclear power plants.

“We urge you to continue to take concrete steps to ensure the national security attributes of U.S. nuclear power plants are properly recognized by policymakers and are valued in U.S. electricity markets,” states the letter.

Overview

On June 1, 2018, President Donald Trump requested that DOE take measures to prevent further closures of nuclear power plants due to a national security interest in securing the national power grid’s resilience.  The recent letter appears to support that request, underscoring the key role of nuclear power toward the national security of the United States, particularly as an essential component of electric grid resilience and the largest source of emission-free generation.

Although the letter acknowledges that discussions concerning the general importance of nuclear energy are underway at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), grid operator and state regulator levels, the letter asserts that only DOE has the power to integrate nuclear power into the broader national security imperatives.  While recognizing that such integration will take time to consider, the letter requests that Secretary Perry take steps to ensure that no additional nuclear power plants are closed in the meantime.

In addition to admirals and vice admirals, signatories to the letter include former U.S. Secretary of State George Shultz; former U.S. Senators Byron Dorgan (D-ND), Judd Gregg (R-NH), Trent Lott (R-MS), Jim Talent (R-MO), and John Warner (R-VA); former New Jersey Governor and former U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Christine Todd Whitman; and, many former industry executives including former General Motors’ Chair and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Daniel Akerson, former AREVA CEO Thomas Christopher, retired Westinghouse Electric Co. and URENCO USA Chair Charles Pryor and former Battelle Memorial Institute President and CEO Jeffrey Wadsworth.  In addition, three former Chairs (Nils Diaz, Dale Klein and Richard Meserve) of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) signed the letter, as well as some former NRC Commissioners and several former Directors of national laboratories.

National Security Benefits

“The national security benefits of a strong domestic nuclear energy sector take many forms,” states the letter, “many of which overlap and together are woven into the nation’s greater strength and resilience.”  The letter continues by citing the following examples:

  • Our nation’s nuclear power plants are among the most robust elements of U.S. critical infrastructure, offering a level of protection against natural and adversarial threats that goes far beyond most other elements of our nation’s electrical grid. The Department of Defense depends on the nation’s grid to power 99 percent of its installations, meaning large scale disruptions affect the nation’s ability to defend itself.
  • Nuclear plants have up to two years’ worth of fuel on site, providing valuable fuel diversity and increasing the resilience of our electrical grid by eliminating the supply vulnerabilities that face some other forms of energy supply.
  • Several national security organizations, including our nuclear Navy and significant parts of the Department of Energy, benefit from a strong civil nuclear sector. Many of the companies that serve the civil nuclear sector also supply the nuclear Navy and major DOE programs.  For example, the Administration’s 2018 Nuclear Posture Review noted that the United States is unable to produce enriched uranium for national security purposes.  Re-establishing this capability will be far easier and more economical with a strong, thriving civil nuclear sector.  Moreover, the nuclear industry is an important career destination for military veterans.
  • Nuclear energy is by far our nation’s largest source of emissions-free generation. Carbon dioxide emissions from other forms of electricity production contribute to changes in our climate, and a changing climate has been identified by the national security community as a national security risk.
  • Competitiveness internationally is inextricably linked to maintaining a strong domestic nuclear program. More than six decades ago, the United States developed what is today the commercial nuclear industry, which established and maintained a leadership role that transcends power generation.  However, we are in jeopardy of losing our edge and missing out on much of a global opportunity estimated at over half a trillion dollars.  Today, there are 56 reactors under construction in the world and this expansion is largely driven by China and Russia.
  • A strong civil nuclear export sector creates deep and long-lasting relationships between the U.S. and partner nations across important areas that advance America’s national security interests, including nonproliferation, nuclear safety, and physical and cyber security. If we do not continue to play a major role in the global market for nuclear reactors, technology and fuel, our influence over nonproliferation and nuclear safety standards will be greatly diminished.

Background

By the end of 2021, twenty-four of the operating nuclear power plants in the United States are either set to close or will no longer be profitable according to a report by Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) that was issued on May 15, 2018.  In addition, the report cautions that more plants are likely to close.  According to the BNEF study, the industry is increasingly challenged by sluggish power demand, inexpensive natural gas and the rise of renewable energy.  This is especially true in the Midwest, where the use of wind power and other renewable power options are being used increasingly.

In this regard, a February 2018 report from BNER and the Business Council for Sustainable Energy found that renewable power had reached 18 percent of the U.S. electricity generation capacity.  The expansion has been spurred, in part, by an increase in hyrdopower investments in the West.  Nuclear power recently contributed about 20 percent, but that figure is declining as operating facilities continue to shut down.

In addition, DOE is currently weighing a March 2018 request from the competitive power unit at FirstEnergy Corporation to declare that an emergency exists its PJM market.  The PJM Energy Market procures electricity to meet consumer’s demands both in real time and in the near term.  It includes the sale or purchase of energy in PJM’s Real-Time Energy Market (five minutes) and Day-Ahead Market (one day forward).  If Secretary Perry agrees to the request, it would mean the PJM would have to compensate both nuclear and coal generators in the at-risk market in order to protect the stability of the grid.

SOUTHEAST COMPACT COMMISSION TELECONFERENCE MEETING OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE September 12, 2018 – 1:00 P.M. EDT

A special called meeting of the Administrative Committee of the Southeast Compact Commission will be held by conference call on September 12, 2018 at 1:00 P.M. EDT.   The Committee will discuss administrative matters related to the continued operations and staffing of the Commission, including, but not limited to, Commission bylaws, staffing requirements, staff salaries and benefits, personnel policies, internal controls for accounting, and transition planning.

If you would like to participate on the call in your state, please click here to view the attached meeting notice for the meeting location in each party state.  For more information, contact us at (secc (at) secompact (dot) org) secc (at) secompact (dot) org

REGISTRATION OPEN FOR FALL 2018 LLW FORUM MEETING AND HISTORIC B REACTOR SITE TOUR

Red Lion Hotel in Richland, Washington
October 2-4, 2018

The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is pleased to announce that registration is now open for our fall 2018 meeting, which will be held at the Red Lion Hotel in Richland, Washington on October 3-4, 2018. 

In terms of planning and making travel arrangements, please note that there will be an optional site tour of Hanford’s Historic B Reactor for interested stakeholders from 1:00 – 5:00 p.m. on October 2, 2018.

The Executive Committee will meet from 7:30 – 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday morning (October 3, 2018).  The Disused Sources Working Group (DSWG) will meet from 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. on Thursday (October 4, 2018). 

Interested stakeholders are encouraged to register and make hotel reservations for the meeting at your earliest convenience, as there is limited space available in our discount room block. 

The Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management is sponsoring the meeting.

The meeting documents—including a meeting bulletin and registration form—are available on the LLW Forum Meeting page of the organization’s web site at http://llwforum.org/llw-forum-meeting/. 

As a new option for interested stakeholders, a registration form may be completed and submitted online.

Attendance

Officials from states, compacts, federal agencies, nuclear utilities, disposal operators, brokers/processors, industry and other interested parties are encouraged to attend the fall 2018 LLW Forum meeting.  

LLW Forum meetings are an excellent opportunity to stay up-to-date on the most recent and significant developments in the area of low-level radioactive waste management and disposal.  They also offer an important opportunity to network with other government and industry officials and to participate in decision-making on future actions and endeavors affecting low-level radioactive waste management and disposal.

LLW Forum Meeting Location and Dates

The fall 2018 LLW Forum meeting will be held on Wednesday, October 3 (9:00 am – 5:00 p.m.) and Thursday, October 4 (9:00 am – 1:00 pm) at: 

Red Lion Richland Hanford House Hotel
802 George Washington Way
Richland, Washington  99354

Located in the heart of historic Richland, the Red Lion Hanford House is centrally located for business and leisure travelers visiting the Hanford Reservation.  The hotel, overlooking the Columbia River, is within easy walking distance of several restaurants and government buildings.

Optional Hanford B Reactor Site Tour Logistics

The Washington State Department of Health will sponsor an optional tour of Hanford’s Historic B Reactor on Tuesday afternoon (October 2, 2018) from 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.  The B Reactor is the world’s first full-scale plutonium production reactor.

Interested parties need to check the box on the LLW Forum meeting registration form, as well as complete and submit the separate Hanford B Reactor optional site tour registration form.  The tour originates from the B Reactor offices located about 7 minutes from the Hanford House.

Registration

All persons must pre-register for the LLW Forum meeting and pay any associated registration fees in order to be allowed entry.  Registration forms are needed in order to ensure that you receive a meeting packet and name badge.  Accordingly, interested attendees are asked to please take a moment to complete the meeting registration form at your earliest convenience and return it to the LLW Forum at the mailing or e-mail address listed at the bottom of the form. 

Attendees that are planning to participate in the optional Hanford B Reactor site tour must also pre-register.  Please note that there is a separate registration form with differential submittal directions for the optional site tour.

The meeting is free for up to two individuals representing members of the LLW Forum.  Additional and non-member registration is $600, payable by check only to the “LLW Forum, Inc.”  (Credit card payments are not accepted.) 

Reservations

Persons who plan to attend the meeting are strongly encouraged to make their hotel reservations and send in their registration forms as soon as possible, as we have exceeded our block at the last few meetings. 

A block of rooms have been reserved for Monday through Thursday (October 1-4, 2018) for meeting attendees at the special, discounted rate of  $96.00 (single/double rate) plus tax.  To make a reservation, please go to the booking link on the attached meeting bulletin or call (509) 946-7611, press zero for the operator and ask for a reservation under the discount group code WSDO1001.  Please note that you must provide the code in order to get the special, discounted rate.

The deadline for reserving a room at the discounted rate is September 10, 2018.  

 

Transportation and Directions  

The Red Lion Richland Hanford House Hotel is located 10-12 minutes from the Pasco Airport, which is the nearest commercial travel connection.

If you have questions or require additional information, please contact Todd D. Lovinger, Esq. — Executive Director of the LLW Forum and Project Director of the Disused Sources and Part 61 Working Groups (DSWG/P61WG) — at (754) 779-7551 or at  (LLWForumInc (at) aol (dot) com) LLWForumInc (at) aol (dot) com